Tuesday, September 30, 2014
   
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[1/10] Bristol Cathedral
[2/10] St. Mary's Redcliffe
[3/10] Colston Hall
[4/10] Clifton Cathedral
[5/10] All Saints', Clifton
[6/10] St. Monica Home of Rest
[7/10] The Lord Mayor's Chapel
[8/10] Redland Park United Reformed Church
[9/10] Westbury-on-Trym Parish Church
[10/10] Wells Cathedral
[1/10] Bristol Cathedral This early perpendicular church is best known for its fine rood-screen rather than the quality of its organ.  This tracker instrument is placed on the right hand side of the chancel  behind a screen. Although of  fairly orthodox design, the pipes are attractively decorated.    No one seems to know who built it but a plate on above the integrated console states that it was rebuilt by J.G.Haskins & Co of Bristol (there is no date).  However  it seems likely that the organ dates back to the end of the 19th Century. It apparently is in need of some attention. Read the Full Story
[2/10] St. Mary's Redcliffe The two manual organ in this splendid Church dating from Medieval times was built by Vowles of Bristol, and it was inaugurated in November 1870.  Although originally placed in the East end of the Church, in 1892 it was moved to its present position in a high gallery on the left hand side of the Chancel.  The organ itself is embraced by an ornate wooden case and the console is tucked away behind the instrument overlooking the choir.  Ranks of diapason pipes are arrayed on three sides. Read the Full Story
[3/10] Colston Hall The casework incorporates parts of the case which used to house the Choir Organ, added by Seede at the end of the 18th century. It was bracketed out behind the organist's seat when the organ was on the screen across the choir. It was known as a 'chair-organ' because the organist had to turn round on his seat to play the organ behind him. Read the Full Story
[4/10] Clifton Cathedral The casework incorporates parts of the case which used to house the Choir Organ, added by Seede at the end of the 18th century. It was bracketed out behind the organist's seat when the organ was on the screen across the choir. It was known as a 'chair-organ' because the organist had to turn round on his seat to play the organ behind him. In the reconstruction of the 19th century it was given away and used as a bookcase in a gentleman's library in County Durham. Read the Full Story
[5/10] All Saints', Clifton The two manual organ in this splendid Church dating from Medieval times was built by Vowles of Bristol, and it was inaugurated in November 1870.  Although originally placed in the East end of the Church, in 1892 it was moved to its present position in a high gallery on the left hand side of the Chancel.  The organ itself is embraced by an ornate wooden case and the console is tucked away behind the instrument overlooking the choir.  Ranks of diapason pipes are arrayed on three sides. Read the Full Story
[6/10] St. Monica Home of Rest The two manual organ in this splendid Church dating from Medieval times was built by Vowles of Bristol, and it was inaugurated in November 1870.  Although originally placed in the East end of the Church, in 1892 it was moved to its present position in a high gallery on the left hand side of the Chancel.  The organ itself is embraced by an ornate wooden case and the console is tucked away behind the instrument overlooking the choir.  Ranks of diapason pipes are arrayed on three sides. Read the Full Story
[7/10] The Lord Mayor's Chapel This early perpendicular church is best known for its fine rood-screen rather than the quality of its organ.  This tracker instrument is placed on the right hand side of the chancel  behind a screen. Although of  fairly orthodox design, the pipes are attractively decorated.    No one seems to know who built it but a plate on above the integrated console states that it was rebuilt by J.G.Haskins & Co of Bristol (there is no date).  However  it seems likely that the organ dates back to the end of the 19th Century. It apparently is in need of some attention. Read the Full Story
[8/10] Redland Park United Reformed Church This early perpendicular church is best known for its fine rood-screen rather than the quality of its organ.  This tracker instrument is placed on the right hand side of the chancel  behind a screen. Although of  fairly orthodox design, the pipes are attractively decorated.    No one seems to know who built it but a plate on above the integrated console states that it was rebuilt by J.G.Haskins & Co of Bristol (there is no date).  However  it seems likely that the organ dates back to the end of the 19th Century. It apparently is in need of some attention. Read the Full Story
[9/10] Westbury-on-Trym Parish Church Text... Read the Full Story
[10/10] Wells Cathedral The casework incorporates parts of the case which used to house the Choir Organ, added by Seede at the end of the 18th century. It was bracketed out behind the organist's seat when the organ was on the screen across the choir. It was known as a 'chair-organ' because the organist had to turn round on his seat to play the organ behind him. Read the Full Story

Welcome message from the President

David-Chandler

Hello and welcome to B&DOA website.

It is an immense privilege to serve as President of the Bristol and District Organists’ Association and a particular pleasure to have assumed this position on the day of the annual Edgar Joyce Memorial Recital in June this year.   This annual event, which draws a large number of people to St Paul’s, Southville, where Edgar was organist for many years, augments the legacy he left for the training of young organists.  The Recital also provides an opportunity for some of our students to display their talents.  We have a good number of young organists in the Association and it is a source of some pride for the Association that so many of them go on to be organ scholars at prestigious cathedrals, and universities throughout the land.  The Edgar Joyce Memorial Fund has helped many of them along the way.

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Bristol & District Organists’ Association

The Bristol and District Organists' Association (BDOA) is affiliated to the 'Incorporated Association of Organists' (IAO) its parent body. There are 100 local associations like the BDOA with a membership of 7,400... Read more

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